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How to answer “Why you were fired” in under 20 seconds…

Most of the time when people get fired they don’t really deserve it and it had nothing to do with their performance.

It could have been for any reason – corporate downsizing, internal politics, not getting along with the new manager, etc.

And now they are faced with the black mark of having been fired.

So what are you supposed to say to prospective employers about why you were fired?

Follow these guidelines to develop your answer to this question:

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Here’s how the interview process is supposed to work…

1.) We send out resumes
2.) We get called for a job interview
3.) We get called back for a second & third job interview
4.) And then we get a job offer

Well at least that’s how it’s supposed to work.  But what are you supposed to do when you are expecting the offer, but it never comes?

Employers might even be so bold as to tell you they plan to make you an offer within the next week.  But what happens when that week has come and gone?

You had a HOT lead and now it’s cooling off. You want to contact them before they forget about you.

This is where a planned follow-up strategy comes into play.

Ideally, at the end of your interview, you should ask them if they mind if you follow-up with them within a given time period. When you do that, now you have their permission to call them.

If you are expecting an offer and it has not come yet, don’t hesitate to call them. And I mean call them, not email, not text, not voice mail. Do your best to catch them at their phone.

Once you do, simply ask them for the status of the position or the offer.

Be prepared to talk to them and consider possible responses and then plan your reply accordingly.

If after a couple of unsuccessful attempts to reach them by phone, you can leave a brief voice message regarding the status of the position and ask them to call you back at their earliest convenience.

It’s that easy…

Criminal history interview questions got you down?

Have you ever been asked, “Have you ever been convicted of a felony or misdemeanor?”

That’s a tough one to answer if  you’ve been convicted.

Hopefully you can just say no.

Keep in mind that a felony and a misdemeanor are two different crimes, with the latter one being less serious.

So if they ask you about a felony, and you have a misdemeanor, you can honestly say no.

They might also ask you if you have been convicted of a crime, thus covering all their bases.

Your best bet is… [click to continue…]

How to hide unemployment gaps

Are you worried about employment gaps?

Are you even more worried what you’ll say to prospective employers about the large gaps on your resume?

I made a short video for you that will give you a few good pointers on how to handle situations like this.

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Most job candidates screw-up this question…

On your next interview, they are going to ask you about your past accomplishments.

They will want to know how your efforts in your last job benefited the company you worked for.

This is a great opportunity for you to brag about yourself but at the same time you don’t want to overdo it.

I made a video that explains exactly how you can brag about yourself to a prospective employer and look awesome.

Most candidates’ screw-up this question, but I don’t want to see that happen to you.

You can watch the video here:

What are your biggest accomplishments

What are your biggest accomplishments?

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Job interviews got you bummed out? This won’t help…

interviewing for jobs and not getting the job

Today’s topic is just to help you feel better if you’ve ever had an interview and didn’t get the job.

We all work hard in preparing for a job interview. We research the company, we practice answering interview questions, we tweak our resume, etc. The list of things we do is endless. And after all those countless hours of preparation we find out after a couple of weeks that we didn’t get the job.

Sometimes it’s very difficult to understand the reason why. We knew we were right for the job and they seemed to like us. Everything fit, but for some unknown reason they chose someone else.

This story happens more often than not to countless job seekers. If it happened to you, don’t feel bad, just treat it as a learning experience and move on.

Sending a letter to the hiring manager and asking what it was about you they didn’t like seems like a good idea, doesn’t it? It’s a very genuine request and if they shared with you the answer, that might help you in future job interviews, right?

But the reality is a cold shoulder and you’re likely to feel even worse after sending a letter only to never hear back from them again.

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Are employers trying to trick you with this question?

The other day one of my clients told me she was asked the following question on a recent job interview.

“Do you have any additional qualities/strengths you would like to add as it relates to this position?”

She wanted to know what the hidden meaning was behind that question and… why would an employer ask such a question.

She really felt like they were trying to trick her into revealing something she might not have otherwise told them.

From her perspective, she has already given them a resume that clearly lists her skills – so what else could there be?

Here’s what I told her:

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Applying for jobs when you are not ready

aplying-for-jobs

Surprisingly, I’ve been getting several emails from customers asking me if it’s okay to start applying for jobs, even though they won’t be able to interview for them for a few months.

Recently, I received an email from Rhonda who received a severance package after 23 years with her company. The next day she was diagnosed with Breast Cancer. Right now, she is going through chemo and expects a full recovery.

She wanted to know if it would be okay for her to start applying for jobs even though she will be physically unable to interview for them for at least a few months.

Here is what I told her:

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